Category Archives: Mind

Antibiotics Alleviate Mental Illness

A cheap antibiotic normally prescribed to teenagers for acne is to be tested as a treatment to alleviate the symptoms of psychosis in patients with schizophrenia, in a trial that could advance scientific understanding of the causes of mental illness.


Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/scientists-shocked-to-find-antibiotics-alleviate-symptoms-of-schizophrenia-7469121.html

Women wearing red says she wants to party

men are more attracted to women wearing red compared to other colours because they believe they are less likely to be rejected.Psychologists behind the research claim the colour red carries subtle but powerful messages about how receptive a woman might be to romantic advances and so men find it more alluring.


Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/science-news/9105879/Women-wearing-red-send-signals-that-attract-men.html

You are a time machine

Time and space are the two fundamental dimensions of our lives. All forms of human behavior require us to process and understand information we receive from our environment in either spatial or temporal patterns. Even though mental timing (temporal processing) research is in a stage of infancy (when compared to spatial processing) important insights regarding the human brain clock have emerged.


Source: http://imhome.org/index.php/latest-news/entry/you-are-a-time-machine.html

We Naturally Sleep in Two Shifts of Four Hours

We often worry about lying awake in the middle of the night – but it could be good for you. A growing body of evidence from both science and history suggests that the eight-hour sleep may be unnatural.In the early 1990s, psychiatrist Thomas Wehr conducted an experiment in which a group of people were plunged into darkness for 14 hours every day for a month.It took some time for their sleep to regulate but by the fourth week the subjects had settled into a very distinct sleeping pattern. They slept first for four hours, then woke for one or two hours before falling into a second four-hour sleep.


Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16964783

Mind-wandering can ruin your mood

Learning mindfulness and meditation techniques can help us minimize stressful mind-wandering and cultivate emotional wellness and happiness. In the coming years further studies of how adult brains are able to change will help us better understand whats involved in emotional well being and promote better mental health for everyone.


Source: http://news.consumerreports.org/health/2012/01/mind-wandering-can-ruin-your-mood.html?EXTKEY=NE22000H

Neuroscience Can Reliably Read Our Minds

It finally happened. Neuroscience technology can now reliably read our minds. Its an accepted fact that is no longer in dispute. Scientists working at the University of California, Berkeley, have successfully decoded brain activities into audible sounds. In other words, our inner thoughts can be translated into sounds clearly articulated by a computer. Needless to say, there are a whole lot of caveats attached to this claim. For a start, in order to make this kind of reading possible, it requires some 256 electrodes be surgically attached to the scalps of at least 15 volunteers. Furthermore, theres a minefield of ethical issues attached to this endeavor that needs to be sorted out.


Source: http://www.fastcompany.com/1814327/neuromarketing-buyology-branding-marketing-martin-lindstrom-decoded-brain-activities

Your Brain is Automatic. You Are Free.

Michael Gazzaniga, one of the world’s leading researchers in cognitive neuroscience, describes the mystery of free will:If you think about it this way, if you are a Martian coming by earth and looking at all these humans and then looking at how they work you wouldntit would never dawn on you to say, Well, now, this thing needs free will! What are you talking about?Whether you are a parent, a philosopher, or the CEO of Facebook, it’s a concept that youll inevitably have to bang your head against — the individual right to choose what one does, what one doesn’t do, what one is exposed to. Most of us are certain that we have free will, though what exactly this amounts to is much less certain, says theencyclopedia of philosophy.


Source: http://bigthink.com/ideas/42384

A pretty woman stops men behaving badly

If the man in your life is suddenly on his best behaviour, have a look around.Men apparently become nicer, kinder and more caring when there is a beautiful woman nearby.Women, however, feel less of a need to impress and remain true to themselves, even when there is a handsome chap hovering in the wings.


Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2095721/Why-pretty-woman-stops-men-behaving-badly–fairer-sex-different-story.html

Brain Myth – Your Memory Is An Exact Account of What You See and Experience


Myth 2: Your Memory Is An Exact Account of What You See and Experience

Some of us have better memories than others, but no memory is perfect. If you need proof, close your eyes and try to imagine the face of someone you know. In fact, try to imagine your own face. While you’ll be able to conjure up a decent idea of the way you or anyone else looks, you won’t be able to envision every last detail. This is because our memories don’t recall anything we see, hear, sell, taste, or touch with much detail at all. Instead, as psychologist Dan Gilbert points out in his book Stumbling On Happiness, our brains record the seemingly necessary details and fill in the rest when it’s time to remember:[T]he elaborate tapestry of our experience is not stored in memory-at least not in its entirety. Rather, it is compressed for storage by first being reduced to a few critical threads, such as a summary phrase (“Dinner was disappointing”) or a small set of key features (tough steak, corked wine, snotty waiter). Later, when we want to remember our experience, our brains quickly reweave the tapestry by fabricating-not by actually retrieving-the bulk of the information that we experience as a memory. This fabrication happens so quickly and effortlessly that we have the illusion (as a good magician’s audience always does) that the entire thing was in our heads the entire time.Gilbert’s conclusions come from memory researcher Daniel Schacter, who believes the construction of memory is very similar to the way we imagine the future:We have argued in recently that memory plays a critical role in allowing individuals to imagine or simulate events that might occur in their personal futures. We have further suggested that understanding memory’s role in future event simulation may be important for understanding the constructive nature of memory, because the former requires a system that allows flexible recombination of elements of past experience, which may also contribute to memory errors.While a little common sense and life experience can demonstrate the imperfections in your (and everyone else’s) memory, Schacter’s research points to two important things: we’re no good at recalling past events or imagining the future because our process for doing either is essentially the sameat least as far as our brain functionality is concerned. While this points to much more of a problem than a solution, it certainly helps to remember that no memory is perfect and we’re all designed to recall with error. Next time someone gets something wrong, it’s at least worth remembering that.


Source: http://lifehacker.com/5867049/nine-stubborn-brain-myths-that-just-wont-die-debunked-by-science

Brain Myths: Left-Brained People Are Organized, Right-Brained People Are Creative

 

Myth 1: Left-Brained People Are Organized, Right-Brained People Are Creative

We’re a stubborn people who become set in our ways, so it’s no wonder we want to believe that our inclination towards creativity or organized thinking is decided at birth. The right- or left-brained myth suggests we’re simply fulfilling a version of our genetic destiny and we should accept our strengths and weaknesses as part of who we are. But as Lisa Collier Cool points out in her article for Yahoo Health, we’re not really right- or left-brained at all:This myth began in the 1800s, where doctors discovered that injury to one side of the brain frequently caused loss of specific abilities. Brain scan experiments, however, show that the two halves of the brain are much more intricately linked than was originally thought, so problem-solving or creative tasks fire up activity in regions of both hemispheres of the brain, not just half. It is true that the right side of the brain controls the left side of the body and vice versa, so a right-brain injury can cause disability on the left side of the body.More recently this myth has been used as an attempt to explain creativity, dyslexia, and even homosexuality in left-handed people, but the origin of the southpaw is still a mystery. Whether or not there is a compelling link between right- or left-handedness and specific common traits remains to be seen, but rest-assured that being more creative or more organized doesn’t inhibit you from having a talent for both.

Source: http://lifehacker.com/5867049/nine-stubborn-brain-myths-that-just-wont-die-debunked-by-science

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